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SADTJ - SADTJ1st2013: Editorial: Message from the President

E-Doc on Thursday, May 30 @ 10:19:38 SAST

2013 brings with it great joy to the profession of dental therapy as the world begins to accept the profession across the globe. From the advent of dental therapy training in the USA, to the new laws that have changed in the UK regarding the non-supervision of dental therapists by dentists, dental therapy is slowly but surely beginning to develop, expand and grow as a profession in the international dental fraternity.


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SADTJ - SADTJ1st2013: Dentin bonding: Influence of hand-piece maintenance sprays on resin bonding to d

E-Doc on Thursday, May 30 @ 10:18:42 SAST
Toyotarou Sugawara:
Undergraduate Student, Tokyo Dental College, Chiba, Japan.

 

Atsushi Kameyama, Nobuyuki Kukidome, Yasuaki Takase, Masatake Tsunoda:
Division of General Dentistry, Tokyo Dental College Chiba Hospital, Chiba, Japan.

Akiko Haruyama:
Department of Dental Materials Science, Tokyo Dental College, Chiba, Japan.

Takumi Oishi:
Department of Dentistry and Oral Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

 

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the influence of maintenance spray on resin bonding to dentin.

Materials and methods: The crown of extracted, caries-free human molars was transversally sectioned with a model trimmer to prepare the dentin surfaces from mid-coronal sound dentin, and then uniformly abraded with #600 silicon carbide paper. The dentin surfaces were randomly divided into three groups: oil-free spray group where maintenance cleaner for air bearing hand pieces was sprayed onto the dentin surface for 1s and rinsed with water spray for 30s; oil-containing spray group where maintenance cleaner for micro motor hand pieces was sprayed onto the dentin surface for 1s and rinsed with water spray for 30s; and control group where the surface was rinsed with water spray for 30s and then air-dried. These surfaces were then bonded with Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Medical), and resin composite (Clearfil AP-X, Kuraray Medical) build-up crowns were incrementally constructed on the bonded surfaces. After storage for 24h in 37°C water, the bonded teeth were sectioned into hour-glass shaped slices (0.7mm thick) perpendicular to the bonded surfaces. The specimens were then subjected to microtensile bond strength (µTBS) testing at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Data were analysed with one-way ANOVA and the Tukey-Kramer test.

Results: Maintenance spray-contaminated specimens (oil-free and oil-containing spray groups) showed significantly lower µTBS than control specimens (P < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference between the spray-contaminated groups (P < 0.05).

Conclusion: Maintenance spray significantly reduces the bond strength of Clearfil SE Bond to dentin.

Keywords: microtensile bond strength, lubricant, maintenance spray, contamination, dentin bonding


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SADTJ - SADTJ1st2013: Primary care oral medicine: Oral white patches

E-Doc on Thursday, May 30 @ 10:16:40 SAST
C Scully: Professor, Consultant, Dean, Eastman Dental Institute for Oral Health Care Sciences, 256 Gray's Inn Road, UCL, University of London, London WC1X 8LD.

 

D H Felix: Consultant, Senior Lecturer, Glasgow Dental Hospital and School, 378 Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow G2 3JZ/Associate Dean for Postgraduate Dental Education, NHS Education for Scotland, 2nd Floor, Hanover Buildings, 66 Rose Street, Edinburgh EH2 2NN.

Abstract

This article provides an overview of current thinking in the more relevant areas of oral medicine for primary care practitioners, written by the authors while they were holding the Presidencies of the European Association for Oral Medicine and the British Society for Oral Medicine, respectively. The article was originally published as part of a series, the latter which gives the detail necessary to assist the primary dental clinical team caring for patients with oral complaints that may be seen in general dental practice. Space precludes inclusion of illustrations of uncommon or rare disorders, or discussion of disorders affecting the hard tissues. Approaching the subject mainly by the symptomatic approach — as it largely relates to the presenting complaint — was considered to be a more helpful approach for GDPs rather than taking a diagnostic category approach. The clinical aspects of the relevant disorders are discussed, including a brief overview of the aetiology, detail on the clinical features and how the diagnosis is made. Guidance on management and when to refer is also provided, along with relevant websites which offer further detail. (Adapted)


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SADTJ - SADTJ1st2013: Toothpaste-induced oral burns

E-Doc on Thursday, May 30 @ 10:11:40 SAST

Krishna Mohan Reddy: Department of periodontics, GPR Dental College and Hospital, Kurnool, Andhra Pradesh.

Mallika Reddy: Department of Oral surgery, KGF Dental College and Hospital, Kolar, Karnataka.

Abstract

Desensitising tooth pastes have been used for treatment of hypersensitivity for decades. Along with its benefits, it can cause some adverse effects. A 60-year-old man experienced oral ulceration as a consequence of application of potassium nitrate paste overnight at lower buccal and lingual area of anterior teeth. Diagnosis was made on the basis of definitive history. Oral lesions healed well within ten days following the use of local and systemic anal and antibiotics.

Keywords: Chemical burn, toothpaste, self-inflicted injuries.

Case reports: Annals and Essences of Dentistry


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SADTJ - SADTJ1st2013: Study of impacted love: kissing molars

E-Doc on Thursday, May 30 @ 10:09:57 SAST

Aydin Gulses: PhD, DDS. Canakkale Military Hospital, Gokceada Surgical Infirmary, Gokceada, Canakkale, Turkey.

Altan Varol: PhD, DDS. Marmara University, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Istanbul, Turkey.

Metin Senceman: PhD, DDS. Gülhane Military Medical Academy, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Etlik, Ankara, Turkey.

Asim Duml: MD, DDS. Marmara University, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology, Istanbul, Turkey.


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SADTJ - Practice Management: Keeping financial records

E-Doc on Wednesday, December 01 @ 13:53:42 SAST

C Gurland: B.Com, CA (SA), CFP.

Specialist advice to medical, dental and paramedical professions.

Running a modern dental practice today comprises much more than ensuring the health of your patients’ mouths. Owning a dental practice is no different to owning any other small business, with you the dental practitioner as its managing director. Being an owner of any small business carries many responsibilities. It is vital that the business is managed competently, ethically and that all statutory requirements are met.


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SADTJ - DENTHASA~3rdQtr2010: Dental Ethics: Good communication is key: how much do I tell a patient?

E-Doc on Friday, October 01 @ 15:11:05 SAST

S Naidoo: DS(Lon), LDS.RCS (Eng), MDPH (Lon), DDPH.RCS (Eng), MChD (Comm Dent), PhD (US). Professor and Principal Specialist, Department of Community Oral Health, University of the Western Cape.
L Doyal: BA, MSc. Emeritus Professor of Medical Ethics, St Barts and The London Medical Hospital, Queen Mary, University of London.

Corresponding author:
Prof S Naidoo:
Professor and Principal Specialist, Department of Community Oral Health, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X1, Tygerberg, 7505. Tel: 021 937 3148. Fax: 021 931 2287. E-mail: suenaidoo@uwc.ac.za

Case scenario

A patient attended for what appeared to be a routine extraction of a lower molar tooth late one afternoon. The extraction proved to be difficult. During the extraction the gingival tissues were lacerated and a root fractured requiring a surgical removal and the placement of sutures. The next day, the patient attended hospital with pain and swelling and only then was advised that the socket had been sutured. Should the dentist have informed him of what had happened and what he had done?


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